Cpl. Ngobese joins a proud legacy of bravery in 7 Medical Battalion Group

Celebrating South African heroes – here Corporal Mandla Maxwell Ngobese from 7 Medical Battalion Group – South African Military Heath Service looks down on his newly presented decoration for bravery – the Nkwe ya Boronse (Bronze Leopard) decoration for valour and joins a proud tradition of this special unit.

Elements of 7 Medical Battalion partook in the Battle of Bangui in the Central African Republic. The battle has been described by military analysts as one of the hardest-fought actions ever by the South African Army. During this battle which lasted from 22 March 2013 – 24 March 2013 a company of about 200 South African paratroops supplemented by a small number of Special Forces members was attacked, near their base in the outskirts of Bangui, by a reb10676374_353960348107037_5707337649502288620_nel force estimated to be up to 3000 strong. During this action 13 South African paratroopers were killed and a further 27 wounded. Rebel losses are estimated to have been well over 800. For their actions during this battle three members of 7 Medical battalion; Sergeant Mampa Serole Colman, Corporal Ngobese Mandla Maxwell and Corporal Nkoana Molatelo Alphina were awarded the Nkwe ya Boronse decoration for valour on 21 February 2014,

Also, together with 1 Parachute Battalion and 5 Special Forces Regiment, 7 Medical Battalion Group received battle honours for the first time.

7 Medical Battalion Group is the specialist Airborne Medical Battalion of the South African Military Health Service. The Battalion’s main task is to render medical support to the South African Special and Airborne Forces

These men join a proud tradition of recipients for valour from this Battalion, starting with Corporalfidler Bruce Andrew Fidler in 1985.  Bruce, also from 7 Medical Battalion Group was attached to 44 Parachute Regiment during Operations in Southern Angola.  A true hero who laid down his life for his friends. His unit was ambushed and in the ensuing firefight, he was captured by enemy forces on 15 September 1985 and subsequently Reported Missing.

Bruce was brutally tortured and interrogated by the enemy before being executed but he never once revealed the presence of his nearby unit thereby enabling the 7 Medical Battalion Group Surgical Team of between 5 and 10 doctors to successfully evade capture and reach South African lines. His remains were repatriated back to South Africa in June 1992. Corporal Bruce Fidler was posthumously awarded the Honoris Crux for his bravery and selfless devotion above and beyond the call of duty in the face of brutal torture. He was 21.

The Nkwe ya (Leopard) series – Bronze, Silver and Gold decoration series for the highest bravery in the military replaced the Honoris Crux – Bronze, Silver and Gold decoration series from 2003.

Thank you to Graham Du Toit for the reference on Bruce Fidler.

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